hiatus completus

my two week sojourn has come to a close.  today is a “dig-out” day – unpack, sort email, sort snail mail, update money stuff, deal with a few urgent and/or lingering matters from before departure, download 2,200+ photos, UPDATE 363HOUSE BLOG….basically, get myself ready to start working again.  some work was accomplished at 363HOUSE whilst i was galavanting around spain, albeit at a glacial pace.  most notably, the bathroom tile was installed.  more to come soon on the accessible design features of jessica’s roll-in shower.

shower

VPL – vertical platform lift

Gallery

This gallery contains 12 photos.

VPL (Vertical Platform Lift) also/formerly known as wheelchair lift.  quite the piece of machinery.  photo gallery below documents how the 13’+ tall tower was inserted into the shaft.  i was skeptical  but, kevin (the installer) kept saying “yeah, we’ll git … Continue reading

accessible door sill detail

one lesson-learned from a new house we built for jessica in 2004 was the impact of exterior door sills.  finding the proper balance of “flushness” (minimizing the “bump” at the door) and weather control (keeping the elements outside where they belong) is the ongoing battle, especially when accommodating a wheelchair.  we thought we had adequately addressed the issue in 2004, but we were wrong. those doors have a very robust weather-resistant sill assembly.  unfortunately, that equated into a robust wheelchair barrier, as well.  we were able to mitigate to some extent by installing small aluminum “ramps” at each door, but the solution remains a basic “fail”.  so, in this house we’ve been determined not to repeat that mistake (we’ll just create some new ones!).  the following documents our low-impact door sill detail.

section detail showing basic components and dimensions.  note: dimensions are specific to the drewexim profile and dimensions.

section detail showing basic components and dimensions. resulting “bump” at interior door sill is about 3/8″ – an easy roll-over for jessica.  one reason we liked the drewexim doors was the availability of this low-profile sill.  the biggest challenge in this detail is providing a suitable thermal break between the edge of the floor slab and the granite.

photo showing recess in foundation wall for lowered sill assembly.

photo showing recess in foundation wall for lowered sill assembly.

here it is at rough install stage.  when backfilled/paved, the granite sill will mostly disappear.  granite seems like a somewhat "precious" material to bury, but these sill pieces only cost about $60 each.  a small price to pay for the durability of granite in this harsh environment.

here it is at rough install stage. when backfilled/paved, the granite sill will mostly disappear. granite seems like a somewhat “precious” material to bury, but these sill pieces only cost about $60 each. a small price to pay for the durability of granite in this harsh environment.

here's what it looks like from exterior.

here’s what it looks like from exterior.

we look forward to exterior paving and jessica’s first “test drive”!